Torii
Torii
Torii
Torii


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Collection Tier:
Tier 3

Asian
Ceremonial Artifacts ➔ Torii

Identifier:
177402
Description:
Miniature brass Torii with hammers (2) and bell. The Torii is the gateway that signals the transition from the profane to the sacred and is located at the entrance into Japanese Shinto shrines.

Made for export. Identified by Bennet Bronson, Professor of History, University of Illinois Chicago, IL; tel: 312.665.7832. 

From 1919-1940 Dr. Huizenga placed many items on 'permanent deposit; these were converted to a gift by daughter Ann mid-1970s.
Materials:
Brass
Dimensions:
7" h 6" w 2" d
Current Location Status:
In Storage
Source:
Gift Of Dr. Lee S. Huizenga
Rights:

Exhibit/Program
Virtual World Cultures Scavenger Hunt (August 2020)
“Culture” is a word that describes the ways of life shared by a
group of people. It has to do with how people live and includes things
such as music, art, religion language, clothing and more.This scavenger hunt
will introduce you to a few of the fascinating customs, beliefs and lifestyles
of people from diverse cultures in our communities and around the world.

Maker/Donor
Dr. Lee S. Huizenga

Lee S. Huizenga was born in Lioessens, Friesland, Netherlands in June of 1881. At just a year old, the Huizenga family moved to the United States and settled in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  He attended Calvin College and Seminary. Before graduating from the seminary, he became an Industrial Instructor for 9 months at the Rehoboth Mission School and preached in churches throughout Gallup, New Mexico.  It was at the Rehoboth Mission School where he would meet his bride-to-be, Matilda Van Dyken. Together they would have five children: Ann Harriet, Myrtle Leonora, Hannah Eunice, Faith Lois, and Philip Lee.

Once Huizenga graduated from Calvin Seminary, he became a pastor for the Christian Reformed Church in Englewood, New Jersey.  While still attending to his responsibilities at the church, he also enrolled at the New York Homeopathic Medical College for medical school.  With his passion for missionary work and his medical knowledge, Huizenga decided to return to the southwest, but his time to Tohatchi, New Mexico as a medical missionary.  After serving the Tohatchi community, Huizenga went back to the east coast to do post-graduate work at the New York Ophthalmic Hospital and the New York Polyclinic.

In 1920, Huizenga was sent to China to help serve hospitals at Jukao (Rhu-gau) as the first foreign medical missionary from the Christian Reformed Church. He served as superintendent of the mission hospital at Jukao from 1923 to 1938. Once the war broke out with Japan, he moved to Shanghai and became a researcher and physician in leprosy and tuberculosis.

Because of his service to the treatment of tuberculosis, he was honored by having his portrait on the center stamp of each sheet of Christmas seals for China in 1947. In 1943, while in Shanghai, Huizenga and his family became prisoners of war. They were placed in the Chapei Civilian Assembly Center, a Japanese internment faculty in Shanghai. Huizenga passed away on July 16, 1945 from a lingering illness. (Courtesy of Calvin College Archives)


Related Place
Japan