Peavey-type Cant Dog Or Hook
Peavey-type Cant Dog Or Hook
Peavey-type Cant Dog Or Hook
Peavey-type Cant Dog Or Hook


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Collection Tier:
Tier 2

Logging ➔ Peavey-type Cant Dog Or Hook

Identifier:
136019
Description:
Although the terms are used interchangeably, the cant hook or cant dog and the peavey hook are actually variations of a logging tool that use similar principals to safely move or roll logs and safely free log jams. Both tools have a long handle and utilize a hook or dog with toe rings that can clamp around the log and provide more stability than a pry bar. A peavey hook, however, also has a spike on the end that can be rammed into the log. Joseph Peavey, a Maine entrepeneur is credited with inventing the peavey in 1857. The Peavey Manufacturing Company still produces them today.
Date:
1867 – 1900
Dimensions:
70.5" h 14" w 3" d
Current Location Status:
On Exhibit
Source:
Gift Of Old Collection
Rights:

Exhibits/Programs
Furniture City (1994 – 2013)
Furniture City was one of the signature core exhibits installed at the Grand Rapids Public Museum's new Van Andel Museum Center when it opened in 1994. At approximately 10,000 square feet, the exhibit occupied a significant portion of the museum's second floor and contained hundreds of pieces of Grand Rapids Furniture. The exhibition was accompanied by the authoritative book on the subject, "Grand Rapids Furniture", by GRPM curator Christian Carron. The Furniture City exhibit told a comprehensive story of the Furniture Industry in Grand Rapids, from its origins in the years after the Civil War, up to the present day with office and fixed seating manufacturers like Steelcase and American Seating. The exhibition was significantly reduced in size in 2013 to make room for a new gallery and was closed in 2019.

Grand Fish, Grand River (January 2016)
Grand River, Grand Fish explores how the Great Lakes region’s largest and oldest fish, the Lake Sturgeon, once found in great abundance, is now a threatened species in our watersheds. The exhibit takes visitors through the connections to Native Americans, fishing history in the region and current science. Using artifacts from the GRPM Collections, along with the two live sturgeon, it will tie together the cultural, historical and scientific connections and explore rehabilitation efforts for this species in the Grand River and throughout the Great Lakes region.
Maker/Donor
Old Collection